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Download Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France PDF

Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 0754661385
Pages : 280 pages
File Format : PDF, EPUB, TEXT, KINDLE or MOBI
Rating : 4.5/5 (466 users download)

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Summary Book Review Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France by Rebecca May Wilkin:

Download or read book Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France written by Rebecca May Wilkin and published by Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.. This book was released on 2008 with total page 280 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Grounded in medical, juridical, and philosophical texts of 16th- and 17th-century France, this study tells the story of how the idea of woman contributed to the emergence of modern science. It challenges scholars to revise deeply held notions regarding the place of women in the early modern search for truth.

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Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781351871600
Pages : 264 pages
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Rating : 4.7/5 (16 users download)

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Summary Book Review Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France by Rebecca M. Wilkin:

Download or read book Women, Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France written by Rebecca M. Wilkin and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-12-05 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Grounded in medical, juridical, and philosophical texts of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century France, this innovative study tells the story of how the idea of woman contributed to the emergence of modern science. Rebecca Wilkin focuses on the contradictory representations of women from roughly the middle of the sixteenth century to the middle of the seventeenth, and depicts this period as one filled with epistemological anxiety and experimentation. She shows how skeptics, including Montaigne, Marie de Gournay, and Agrippa von Nettesheim, subverted gender hierarchies and/or blurred gender difference as a means of questioning the human capacity to find truth; while "positivists" who strove to establish new standards of truth, for example Johann Weyer, Jean Bodin, and Guillaume du Vair, excluded women from the search for truth. The book constitutes a reevaluation of the legacy of Cartesianism for women, as Wilkin argues that Descartes' opening of the search for truth "even to women" was part of his appropriation of skeptical arguments. This book challenges scholars to revise deeply held notions regarding the place of women in the early modern search for truth, their role in the development of rational thought, and the way in which intellectuals of the period dealt with the emergence of an influential female public.

Download Witchcraft, Demonology, and Confession in Early Modern France PDF

Witchcraft, Demonology, and Confession in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781316240625
Pages : pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (62 users download)

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Summary Book Review Witchcraft, Demonology, and Confession in Early Modern France by Virginia Krause:

Download or read book Witchcraft, Demonology, and Confession in Early Modern France written by Virginia Krause and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2015-01-19 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Denounced by neighbors and scrutinized by demonologists, the early modern French witch also confessed, self-identified as a witch and as the author of horrific deeds. What led her to this point? Despair, solitude, perhaps even physical pain, but most decisively, demonology's two-pronged prosecutorial and truth-seeking confessional apparatus. This book examines the systematic and well-oiled machinery that served to extract, interpret, and disseminate witches' confessions in early modern France. For the demonologist, confession was the only way to find out the truth about the clandestine activities of witches. For the witch, however, trial confessions opened new horizons of selfhood. In this book, Virginia Krause unravels the threads that wove together the demonologist's will to know and the witch's subjectivity. By examining textual and visual evidence, Krause shows how confession not only generated demonological theory but also brought forth a specific kind of self, which we now recognize as the modern subject.

Download Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France PDF

Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781317097518
Pages : 316 pages
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Rating : 4.9/5 (751 users download)

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Summary Book Review Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France by Lewis C. Seifert:

Download or read book Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France written by Lewis C. Seifert and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-03-03 with total page 316 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Today the friendships that grab people’s imaginations are those that reach across inequalities of class and race. The friendships that seem to have exerted an analogous level of fascination in early modern France were those that defied the assumption, inherited from Aristotle and patristic sources, that friendships between men and women were impossible. Together, the essays in Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France tell the story of the declining intelligibility of classical models of (male) friendship and of the rising prominence of women as potential friends. The revival of Plato’s friendship texts in the sixteenth century challenged Aristotle’s rigid ideal of perfect friendship between men. In the seventeenth century, a new imperative of heterosociality opened a space for the cultivation of cross-gender friendships, while the spiritual friendships of the Catholic Reformation modeled relationships that transcended the gendered dynamics of galanterie. Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France argues that the imaginative experimentation in friendships between men and women was a distinctive feature of early modern French culture. The ten essays in this volume address friend-making as a process that is creative of self and responsive to changing social and political circumstances. Contributors reveal how men and women fashioned gendered selves, and also circumvented gender norms through concrete friendship practices. By showing that the benefits and the risks of friendship are magnified when gender roles and relations are unsettled, the essays in this volume highlight the relevance of early modern friend-making to friendship in the contemporary world.

Download Female Amerindians in Early Modern Spanish Theater PDF

Female Amerindians in Early Modern Spanish Theater


Author :
Publisher : Bucknell University Press
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781611486117
Pages : 294 pages
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Rating : 4.8/5 (611 users download)

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Summary Book Review Female Amerindians in Early Modern Spanish Theater by Gladys Robalino:

Download or read book Female Amerindians in Early Modern Spanish Theater written by Gladys Robalino and published by Bucknell University Press. This book was released on 2014-08-20 with total page 294 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book uses a gender perspective to study the female Amerindian characters in Early Modern Spanish Comedias. The chapters in this collection bring different approaches and perspectives that intersect between feminism and cultural studies while they also critically deconstruct the European representation of Amerindian women.

Download Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France PDF

Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781317174073
Pages : 220 pages
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Rating : 4.7/5 (47 users download)

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Summary Book Review Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France by Kirk D. Read:

Download or read book Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France written by Kirk D. Read and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-04-15 with total page 220 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The pregnant, birthing, and nurturing body is a recurring topos in early modern French literature. Such bodies, often metaphors for issues and anxieties obtaining to the gendered control of social and political institutions, acquired much of their descriptive power from contemporaneous medical and scientific discourse. In this study, Kirk Read brings together literary and medical texts that represent a range of views, from lyric poets, satirists and polemicists, to midwives and surgeons, all of whom explore the popular sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century narratives of birth in France. Although the rhetoric of birthing was widely used, strategies and negotiations depended upon sex and gender; this study considers the male, female, and hermaphroditic experience, offering both an analysis of women's experiences to be sure, but also opening onto the perspectives of non-female birthers and their place in the social and political climate of early modern France. The writers explored include Rabelais, Madeleine and Catherine Des Roches, Louise Boursier, Pierre de Ronsard, Pierre Boaistuau and Jacques Duval. Read also explores the implications of the metaphorical use of reproduction, such as the presentation of literary work as offspring and the poet/mentor relationship as that of a suckling child. Foregrounded in the study are the questions of what it means for women to embrace biological and literary reproduction and how male appropriation of the birthing body influences the mission of creating new literary traditions. Furthermore, by exploring the cases of indeterminate birthing entities and the social anxiety that informs them, Read complicates the binarisms at work in the vexed terrain of sexuality, sex, and gender in this period. Ultimately, Read considers how the narrative of birth produces historical conceptions of identity, authority, and gender.

Download Towards an Equality of the Sexes in Early Modern France PDF

Towards an Equality of the Sexes in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781000348927
Pages : 240 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (892 users download)

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Summary Book Review Towards an Equality of the Sexes in Early Modern France by Derval Conroy:

Download or read book Towards an Equality of the Sexes in Early Modern France written by Derval Conroy and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-02-24 with total page 240 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume sets out to examine the ways in which an equality between the sexes is constructed, conceptualised, imagined or realised in early modern France, a period and a country which produced some of the earliest theorisations on equality. In so doing, it aims to contribute towards the development of the history of equality as an intellectual category within the history of political thought, and to situate "the woman question" within that history. The eleven chapters in the volume span the fields of political theory, philosophy, literature, history and history of ideas, bringing together literary scholars, historians, philosophers and scholars of political thought, and examining an extensive range of primary sources. Whilst most of the chapters focus on the conceptualisation of a moral, metaphysical or intellectual equality between the sexes, space is also given to concrete examples of a de facto gender equality in operation. The volume is aimed at scholars and graduate students of political thought, history of philosophy, women’s history and gender studies alike. It aims to throw light on the history of Western ideas of equality and difference, questions which continue to preoccupy cultural historians, philosophers, political theorists and feminist critics.

Download The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France PDF

The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781317035114
Pages : 266 pages
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Rating : 4.3/5 (511 users download)

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Summary Book Review The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France by Domna C. Stanton:

Download or read book The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France written by Domna C. Stanton and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-03-23 with total page 266 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In its six case studies, The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France works out a model for (early modern) gender, which is articulated in the introduction. The book comprises essays on the construction of women: three in texts by male and three by female writers, including Racine, Fénelon, Poulain de la Barre, in the first part; La Guette, La Fayette and Sévigné, in the second. These studies thus also take up different genres: satire, tragedy and treatise; memoir, novella and letter-writing. Since gender is a relational construct, each chapter considers as well specific textual and contextual representations of men. In every instance, Stanton looks for signs of conformity to-and deviations from-normative gender scripts. The Dynamics of Gender adds a new dimension to early modern French literary and cultural studies: it incorporates a dynamic (shifting) theory of gender, and it engages both contemporary critical theory and literary historical readings of primary texts and established concepts in the field. This book emphasizes the central importance of historical context and close reading from a feminist perspective, which it also interrogates as a practice. The Afterword examines some of the meanings of reading-as-a-feminist.

Download Involuntary Confessions of the Flesh in Early Modern France PDF

Involuntary Confessions of the Flesh in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781611496260
Pages : 187 pages
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Rating : 4.9/5 (626 users download)

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Summary Book Review Involuntary Confessions of the Flesh in Early Modern France by Nora Martin Peterson:

Download or read book Involuntary Confessions of the Flesh in Early Modern France written by Nora Martin Peterson and published by Rowman & Littlefield. This book was released on 2016-09-14 with total page 187 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Involuntary Confessions of the Flesh in Early Modern France is an interdisciplinary study of moments in which the early modern body loses control of its surface. Rather than read these moments as forerunners to the Freudian slip, it suggests that these moments are vital players in shaping various early modern discourses. This book pairs literary texts with religious, legal, and courtly documents in order to highlight the urgency and messiness of the relationships between body, self, and text.

Download Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth-Century French Literature PDF

Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth-Century French Literature


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781317073871
Pages : 260 pages
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Rating : 4.7/5 (387 users download)

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Summary Book Review Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth-Century French Literature by Bernadette Höfer:

Download or read book Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth-Century French Literature written by Bernadette Höfer and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-04-15 with total page 260 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Bernadette Höfer's innovative and ambitious monograph argues that the epistemology of the Cartesian mind/body dualism, and its insistence on the primacy of analytic thought over bodily function, has surprisingly little purchase in texts by prominent classical writers. In this study Höfer explores how Surin, Molière, Lafayette, and Racine represent interconnections of body and mind that influence behaviour, both voluntary and involuntary, and that thus disprove the classical notion of the mind as distinct from and superior to the body. The author's interdisciplinary perspective utilizes early modern medical and philosophical treatises, as well as contemporary medical compilations in the disciplines of psychosomatic medicine, neurobiology, and psychoanalysis, to demonstrate that these seventeenth-century French writers established a view of human existence that fully anticipates current thought regarding psychosomatic illness.

Download Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature PDF

Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781317113386
Pages : 262 pages
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Rating : 4.1/5 (338 users download)

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Summary Book Review Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature by David P. LaGuardia:

Download or read book Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature written by David P. LaGuardia and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-05-06 with total page 262 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature is an in-depth analysis of normative masculinity in a specific corpus from pre-modern Europe: narrative literature devoted to the subject of adultery and cuckoldry. The text begins with a set of general questions that serve as a conceptual framework for the literary analyses that follow: why were early modern readers so fascinated by the figure of the cuckold? What was his relation to the real world of sexual behavior and gender relations? What effect did he have on the construction of actual masculinities? To respond to these questions, David LaGuardia develops a theoretical approach that is based both on modern critical theory and on close readings of records and documents from the period. Reading early modern legal texts, penance manuals, criminal registers, and exempla collections in relation to the Cent nouvelles nouvelles, Rabelais's Tiers Livre, and Brantôme's Dames galantes, LaGuardia formulates a definition of masculinity in this historical context as a set of intertextual practices that men used to relay and to reinforce their gender identities. By examining legal and literary artifacts from this particular period and culture, this study highlights the extent to which this supposedly normative masculinity was historically contingent and materially conditioned by generic practices.

Download The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France PDF

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781317028000
Pages : 278 pages
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Rating : 4.2/5 (8 users download)

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Summary Book Review The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France by Lyndan Warner:

Download or read book The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France written by Lyndan Warner and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-03-03 with total page 278 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France provides the first comprehensive comparison of the printed debates in the 1500s over the superiority or inferiority of woman - the Querelle des femmes - and the dignity and misery of man. Analysing these writings side by side, Lyndan Warner reveals the extent to which Renaissance authors borrowed commonplaces from both traditions as they praised or blamed man or woman and habitually considered opposite and contrary points of view. In the law courts reflections on the virtues and vices of man and woman had a practical application-to win cases-and as Warner demonstrates, Parisian lawyers employed this developing rhetoric in family disputes over inheritance and marriage, and amplified it in the published versions of their pleadings. Tracing these ideas and modes of thinking from the writer's quill to the workshops and boutiques of printers and booksellers, Warner uses probate inventories to follow the books to the households of their potential male and female readers. Warner reveals the shifts in printed discussions of human nature from the 1500s to the early 1600s and shows how booksellers adapted the ways they marketed and sold new genres such as essays and lawyers' pleadings.

Download Chance, Literature, and Culture in Early Modern France PDF

Chance, Literature, and Culture in Early Modern France


Author :
Publisher : Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781409475279
Pages : 244 pages
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Rating : 4.7/5 (527 users download)

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Summary Book Review Chance, Literature, and Culture in Early Modern France by Ms Kathleen Wine:

Download or read book Chance, Literature, and Culture in Early Modern France written by Ms Kathleen Wine and published by Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.. This book was released on 2013-04-28 with total page 244 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In the Renaissance and early modern periods, there were lively controversies over why things happen. Central to these debates was the troubling idea that things could simply happen by chance. In France, a major terrain of this intellectual debate, the chance hypothesis engaged writers coming from many different horizons: the ancient philosophies of Epicurus, the Stoa, and Aristotle, the renewed reading of the Bible in the wake of the Reformation, a fresh emphasis on direct, empirical observation of nature and society, the revival of dramatic tragedy with its paradoxical theme of the misfortunes that befall relatively good people, and growing introspective awareness of the somewhat arbitrary quality of consciousness itself. This volume is the first in English to offer a broad cultural and literary view of the field of chance in this period. The essays, by a distinguished team of scholars from the U.S., Britain, and France, cluster around four problems: Providence in Question, Aesthetics and Poetics of Chance, Law and Ethics, and Chance and its Remedies. Convincing and authoritative, this collection articulates a new and rich perspective on the culture of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century France.

Download Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 1600–1800 PDF

Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 1600–1800


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781351928663
Pages : 362 pages
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Rating : 4.2/5 (866 users download)

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Summary Book Review Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 1600–1800 by Barbara R. Woshinsky:

Download or read book Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 1600–1800 written by Barbara R. Woshinsky and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-12-05 with total page 362 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Blending history and architecture with literary analysis, this ground-breaking study explores the convent's place in the early modern imagination. The author brackets her account between two pivotal events: the Council of Trent imposing strict enclosure on cloistered nuns, and the French Revolution expelling them from their cloisters two centuries later. In the intervening time, women within convent walls were both captives and refugees from an outside world dominated by patriarchal power and discourses. Yet despite locks and bars, the cloister remained "porous" to privileged visitors. Others could catch a glimpse of veiled nuns through the elaborate grills separating cloistered space from the church, provoking imaginative accounts of convent life. Not surprisingly, the figure of the confined religious woman represents an intensified object of desire in male-authored narrative. The convent also spurred "feminutopian" discourses composed by women: convents become safe houses for those fleeing bad marriages or trying to construct an ideal, pastoral life, as a counter model to the male-dominated court or household. Recent criticism has identified certain privileged spaces that early modern women made their own: the ruelle, the salon, the hearth of fairy tale-telling. Woshinsky's book definitively adds the convent to this list.

Download Guardianship, Gender, and the Nobility in Early Modern Spain PDF

Guardianship, Gender, and the Nobility in Early Modern Spain


Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9781351931991
Pages : 184 pages
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Rating : 4.3/5 (199 users download)

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Summary Book Review Guardianship, Gender, and the Nobility in Early Modern Spain by Grace E. Coolidge:

Download or read book Guardianship, Gender, and the Nobility in Early Modern Spain written by Grace E. Coolidge and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-12-05 with total page 184 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Contrary to early modern patriarchal assumptions, this study argues that rather trying to impose obedience or enclosure on women of their own rank and status, noblemen in early modern Spain depended on the active collaboration of noblewomen to maintain and expand their authority, wealth, and influence. While the image of virtuous, secluded, silent, and chaste women did bolster male authority in general and help to assure individual noblemen that their children were their own, the presence of active, vocal, and political women helped these same men move up the social ladder, guard their property and wealth, gain political influence, win legal battles, and protect their minor heirs. Drawing on a variety of documents-guardianships, wills, dowry and marriage contracts, lawsuits, genealogies, and a few letters-from the family archives of the nine noble families housed in the Osuna and Frías collections in Toledo, Guardianship, Gender and the Nobility in Early Modern Spain explores the lives and roles of female guardians. Grace Coolidge examines in detail the legal status of these women, their role within their families, and their responsibilities for the children and property in their care. To Spanish noblemen, Coolidge argues, the preservation of family, power, and lineage was more important than the prescriptive gender roles of their time, and faced with the emergency generated by the premature death of the male title holder, they consistently turned to the adult women in their families for help. Their need for support and for allies against their own mortality meant, in turn, that they expected and trained their female relatives to take an active part in the economic and political affairs of the family.

Download Journal of Early Modern Studies - Volume 1, Issue 1 (Fall 2012) PDF

Journal of Early Modern Studies - Volume 1, Issue 1 (Fall 2012)


Author :
Publisher : Zeta Books
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9786068266350
Pages : 210 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (635 users download)

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Summary Book Review Journal of Early Modern Studies - Volume 1, Issue 1 (Fall 2012) by Alexandrescu, Vlad:

Download or read book Journal of Early Modern Studies - Volume 1, Issue 1 (Fall 2012) written by Alexandrescu, Vlad and published by Zeta Books. This book was released on 2012-01-01 with total page 210 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:

Download Monsters and Their Meanings in Early Modern Culture PDF

Monsters and Their Meanings in Early Modern Culture


Author :
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9780199577026
Pages : 361 pages
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Rating : 4.7/5 (72 users download)

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Summary Book Review Monsters and Their Meanings in Early Modern Culture by Wes Williams:

Download or read book Monsters and Their Meanings in Early Modern Culture written by Wes Williams and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2011-05-26 with total page 361 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Wes Williams explores the place of monsters in the early modern imagination, charting the migration of the monstrous from natural history to moral philosophy, from descriptions of creatures found in the external world to the drama of human motivation, of sexual and political identity. At its centre are readings of major works of French literature.